There’s No Place Like Holmes

Following is the front cover for my next book, There’s No Place Like Holmes: Exploring Sense of Place Through the Sherlock Holmes Stories and the text for the back cover. It will be published in March 2008.

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‘Derham Groves has had the brilliant idea of considering architecture as a detective story. It is a fascinating thought—that buildings might be crime scenes: in both bodies go missing—and Groves unfolds it in fascinating ways. If modern architecture has notoriously failed to make places where people can live, perhaps it is time architecture was put on trial. If so, the designs of its rooms are vital clues! Derham Groves is on the trail of a particular lost body: the home of Sherlock Holmes. He has students design buildings constructed like brilliant deductions. He designs a Sherlock Holmes Centre where the great man is absent but clues to his presence lie everywhere. An absorbing meditation on the way we read architecture, an engaging challenge to designers and the stories they tell, There’s No Place Like Holmes possesses the rare quality of making what seemed cryptic in architecture elementary, and the obvious once again filled with enchantment.’
Paul Carter, Professorial Fellow, University of Melbourne.

‘Everybody knows that architecture is a cover job for the messy realities of everyday life. Yet it remains the most taken for granted and everyday of the arts—nobody suspects the architect. The world of crime fiction with its labyrinthine plots and dead ends, its shared interest in ‘place’ and ‘character’, is used here to preface a kind of forensic architectural theory. Buildings tell stories and stories produce buildings. This is an innovative and insightful book, as much about education as architecture. Just as Holmes used a magnifying glass decode the clues to crime, Groves uses Holmes as a lens onto the role of architecture in the everyday and in the construction of the sense of place.’
Kim Dovey, Professor of Architecture and Urban Design, University of Melbourne.

Conan Doyle’s Moustache For Sale

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Dominic Winter Book Auctions, Lot 271: Doyle (Sir Arthur Conan, 1859-1930). Trimmings from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s moustache preserved by his second wife Lady Jean Conan Doyle, c. 1930, the small cluster of hairs centrally window-mounted beneath a facsimile of the handwritten envelope (‘My beloved moustache hairs’) from which the hairs were taken, printed caption beneath and b & w photo. portrait of pipe-smoking Doyle and Sherlock Holmes on either side, together with a similar display of three pieces of silver card confetti (horse shoe, heart and shoe) from the second wedding of Conan Doyle to Jean Blyth Leckie on the 18th September 1907, neatly window mounted with b & w portraits of both parties, a facsimile of the handwritten envelope from which the confetti came and a printed caption beneath, both framed and glazed, approx. 30 x 50 cm (2) £100-150